When Should Managers Do Team Building?

Kevin P. Dincher

In a recent article about why team building efforts are often less than successful (Team Building?!?! Oh, No!) I said, “…effective team development requires knowing when to do team building—and when not to do team building.” Since the article was about failed team building efforts, I focused on knowing when not to do team building and identified some situations when managers often attempt team building but shouldn’t. Of course, that left the other half of the statement hanging: when should you do team building?

Do team building when you can clearly identify a need for improving the team’s performance.  Team building is about improving team performance—not about promoting a team environment. Effective team building changes the way your people work (both individually and as a group) so that the team is better able to meet its goals and achieve its mission.

Team building that focuses nebulously on “building a team environment” or “promoting teamwork” or some other “feel good” purpose rarely result in change—and are the type of team building sessions that tend to produce cynicism and resistance. No one believes anything will be different once everyone returns to the office—except perhaps that they will be further behind in their work after being away for a day or two. And they are probably right.

Effective team building addresses your team’s real needs and enhances the team’s ability to meet the needs of its customers, co-workers and other stakeholders—and needs to be designed to achieve tangible and important performance outcomes.

The need to improve performance may be internal to the team. Obviously, any breakdown within the teamwork indicates that a team needs help. Poor execution and troubled interpersonal relationships are frequent reasons that managers initiate team building. Dysfunctional behaviors like

  • Avoidance of team interactions (i.e., missing meetings)
  • Chronic complaining
  • Decreased communication, directness and openness
  • Absenteeism, apathy or lack of interest
  • Blaming others or undermining the efforts of others

keep people from working effectively together and may be signs of “team distress.”

Managers must determine if these are the behaviors of just one or two individuals or are widespread throughout the team. If they are the behavior of a couple of individuals, then the manager needs to address these behaviors on an individual basis. If, however, these behaviors are widespread, then team building can help address the underlying issues—but only if you pinpoint the specific issues and needs, establish clear performance goals for the team building effort, and design a team building effort that specifically addresses those issues.

The need to strengthen team performance may be strategic. Even if your team does not show signs of “team distress,” changes and circumstances can challenges your team’s ability to maintain its effectiveness or provide opportunities for your team to “up its game.” Team building can help with a wide range of these needs.  Just a few examples are:

  • You are new as the team leader or there are several new team members;
  • The team needs to agree on its strategic vision or clarify its shared values in light of changes in the company’s strategy;
  • The team needs to strengthen its relationship with internal and/or external customers;
  • The company is going through a major change—such as a merger or acquisition—that impacts roles, structure and lines of authority, and your team needs help shifting gears.
  • The team needs to form strategic alliances with another team and start to work more effectively across what had previously been clear boundaries.

Team building can help your team determine how to address these issues and ensure its ongoing effectiveness—although, just was with issues of team distress, only if you pinpoint the specific issues and needs, establish clear performance goals for the team building effort, and design a team building effort that specifically addresses those issues.

Identifying real needs helps build commitment. Since the expectation for team building is usually some change in the way people work, team requires a commitment by the team leader and by every member of the team. Everyone on the team needs to understand that the effort is about making changes and needs to commit to the resulting changes. When team building addresses specific needs that your people experience as real and when the goals of team building are clear, tangible and important, then your people are more likely to commit—and your team building effort more apt to succeed in improving your team’s performance.

So, when should you do team building? When you:

  1. Can identify a need for improved performance on the part of the team,
  2. Can establish clear, tangible and important goals for the team building effort, and
  3. Can plan a team building effort designed specifically to achieve those goals.

Kevin P Dincher is an organization development consultant, professional development coach and educator with 30 years of experience that includes not only OD consulting but also work in adult education,  counseling psychology and crisis management, program and operations management, and human resources.  Kevin currently provide services to non-profit organizations through a partnership with Professionals in Philanthropy.

LinkedIn: Kevin P. Dincher

 

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Are You Leading a Team – or a Group Masquerading as a Team? (II)

Kevin P. Dincher

Continued from Are You Leading a Team – or a Group Masquerading as a Team? (I)

Your team can’t describe its mission?  Then maybe you are actually leading a “group” masquerading as a “team.”   Calling a group a “team” doesn’t make it so – and if you are a leader, knowing the difference between a “group” and a “team” needs to be more than a case of semantics.   “As a leader, it’s important to make this ‘Groups v Teams’ distinction.  Your approach to leading each will be completely different.   For managers to make better decisions about whether, when, or how to encourage and use teams, it is important to be more precise about what a team is and what it isn’t” (The Discipline of Teams, Harvard Business Review) .   In other words, knowing whether you are leading a “group” or a “team” is critical to your success.  (Are You Leading a Team – or a Group Masquerading as a Team? (I))

Leading a team is much more complex than leading a group.  Team work is rooted in a shared mission, focuses on collaboration, and progresses through developing interactive relationships.  Therefore both communication and conflict take on different qualities when you are leading a team—and require a different set of skills if you are to effectively facilitate the web of relationships between team members and between the team and its collective outputs.

Communication

Managing communication within a workgroup is difficult enough—but compared to managing communication in a team managing a workgroup’s communications is a walk in the park.  Communication in workgroups tends to be about information flow—getting information to the people who need it.  But teamwork occurs through complex, collaborative relationships and progresses through discussion, dialogue and even conflict.

  • To be a successful team leader you need to develop your facilitation skills.  First of all, you must to be able to effectively facilitate a dialogue among the team members that leads them to a shared commitment to their common mission–or else they will never become a genuine team.
  • The collaborative nature of teamwork requires ongoing consensus building among team members; as a team leader you need consensus-building skills.
  • Good active listening skills are the key to promoting dialogue and to building consensus.  Active listening skills enable you to help team members to express themselves.  These skills also make it possible for you to uncover unspoken assumptions among team members and clarify nuances in meaning.  Perhaps most challenging, the nature of teams as collaborative relationships means that you need to listen for and respond to underlying feelings as team members develop relationships, discuss their work and work towards decisions.

Conflict Resolution

Conflict in workgroups tends to be more personal rather than professional.  One employee’s behavior or attitude is annoying to other employees or is interfering with other employees’ ability to get their jobs done.  When group leaders become aware of the conflict (and decide to do more than hope that it will eventually blow over), resolving the conflict is a matter of dealing with a difficult employee’s behavior:  you consult with HR, follow procedures, and struggle to manage the behavior of the employees involved.

Conflict in teams is a very different kettle of fish.  Of course it may have a personal element at times, but conflict in teams is more often professional.  Conflict is inevitable in collaborative relationships among a group of diverse professionals with varied strengths, experiences and perspectives.  Conflict over strategies, tactics, processes, etc. are bound to occur.  Conflict in teams, however, is not just an inevitable bump in the road; conflict and conflict resolution are important parts of the collaborative, consensus-building process.  Team leaders need effective conflict resolution skills to resolve conflicts while eliciting new insights, generating creativity and innovation, leaving all members of the team feeling satisfied, and keeping everyone working toward the same goal.

Leading a Team Requires Additional Skills

The mission focus and collaborative work process  of team makes them very different from workgroups with their focus on task and independent work processes.  As a result leading a team requires a different level of communication and conflict resolution skills.  What other skills do you think are needed in order to be a successful team leader?


Kevin Dincher is an organization development consultant, professional development coach and educator with 30 years of experience that includes not only OD consulting but also work in adult education,  counseling psychology and crisis management, program and operations management, and human resources.

LinkedIn: Kevin Dincher

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Are You Leading a Team – or a Group Masquerading as a Team? (Part I)

Kevin P. Dincher

Your team can’t describe its mission?  Then maybe you are actually leading a “group” masquerading as a “team.”   Calling a group a “team” doesn’t make it so – and if you are a leader, knowing the difference between a “group” and a “team” needs to be more than a case of semantics.   “As a leader, it’s important to make this ‘Groups v Teams’ distinction.  Your approach to leading each will be completely different.   For managers to make better decisions about whether, when, or how to encourage and use teams, it is important to be more precise about what a team is and what it isn’t” (” target=”_blank”>The Discipline of Teams by Katzenbach and Smith) .   In other words, knowing whether you are leading a “group” or a “team” is critical to your success.

Workgroups Cooperate

You are leading a “group” if members are focused on successfully completing their own tasks.

  • They probably recognize themselves as a distinct unit or department tasked with fulfilling a particular function.
  • Membership in the group is task-determined:  functions are broken down into tasks, positions are created to perform those tasks and people are hired to fill those positions.
  • Members of groups work together cooperatively but relatively independently to accomplish the tasks and goals assigned to their positions.   Those goals, of course, are likely related to one another, but they are distinct.
  • Performance is generally an assessment of how well individuals perform and complete their own tasks and achieve their goals.

Leading a workgroup, therefore, generally focuses on assigning tasks and managing individual performance.

Teams Collaborate

Your “group” only becomes a “team” when everyone on the team can describe a common mission—and is focused on and committed to achieving that common mission.  If they can’t describe their common mission, then they may be a group masquerading as a team.

  • Like workgroups, teams see themselves as an identifiable unit.  They may  not be  structured as a traditional department because rather than carrying out a specific function a team is chartered with achieving a mission.
  • Membership on a team is most often determined by the skills, talents and expertise needed to achieve the mission rather than by position.
  • Team members don’t just cooperate; they collaborate.  This is more than the just the intersection of goals seen in cooperative workgroup; it is a deep, collective determination to reach an identical objective.  No one works independently; team members and team work are highly interdependent.
  • Teams are built on collective experience and competence—and no one succeeds simply by completing their own tasks.  Success and goals—both individual and collective—are met only when the common mission is achieved.

Leading a team is much more complex than leading a group.  Team work is rooted in a shared mission, focuses on collaboration and progresses through developing interactive relationships.  Communication, conflict resolution, employee development and culture building all require that team leaders possess a very different set of skills to facilitate the web of relationships between team members and between the team and its collective outputs.


Kevin Dincher is an organization development consultant, professional development coach and educator with 30 years of experience that includes not only OD consulting but also work in adult education,  counseling psychology and crisis management, program and operations management, and human resources.

LinkedIn: Kevin Dincher

Posted in Leadership, Organization Development (OD), Teams. Tags: , , , . Comments Off on Are You Leading a Team – or a Group Masquerading as a Team? (Part I)

Calling a Group a Team Doesn’t Make it So

Kevin P. Dincher

Several of my clients in recent years have insisted on referring to their employees as a team and have pointed to how well their employees get along with one another as the metric of their effectiveness as a team.  This always reminds me of a story about Abraham Lincoln in That Brings to Mind, a collection of anecdotes (most of them probably apocryphal) complied by Ralph L. Marquard.

The Great Emancipator, Abraham Lincoln, was asked by a congressman why he hadn’t freed the slaves earlier in his term of office.  Lincoln replied that the time had not been right; he wouldn’t have been able to enforce the proclamation. The congressman was puzzles and didn’t understand what the president meant.  Lincoln explained with a question, “How many legs will a sheep have, if you call the tail a leg?” “Five,” responded the congressman.  “Not so,” said Lincoln wisely. “Calling a tail a leg doesn’t make it so.”

Calling a group of employees a team doesn’t make them a team, no matter how well they get along.  They may just be a group of workers who really like one another—or at least have learned to pretend to like one another.

When does a “Group” become a “Team”?

A group becomes a team when:

1.  The members share a commitment to common purpose or mission with shared goals and objectives.

Members of a group generally have a common interest in goals that are given them by management, but team members share a common commitment to purpose.  Groups and teams have differing relationships with their reason for existing; that difference is this:  while management establishes the mission of the team, the teams establish ownership of their purpose and usually spend a great deal of time establishing and clarifying their purpose.

2.  Team membership is determined by skill sets rather than by position. 

In order to function as a team, members must possess complimentary skill sets—and all the skills needed to accomplish the team’s purpose must be included on the team.

3.  The members’ performance is measure by both individual contributions and collective work outcomes.

In groups, performance is generally measured by the work of individual members.  The performance of teams, however, depends on both individual contributions and collective work products—the joint outcome of team members working in concert.

 4.  The members hold themselves and one another accountable. 

Groups and teams have different relationships with management.  Group members respond to and are held accountable by management.  Managers determine specific goals, timing and the approach that the group will take.  By contrast, once management establishes the mission of a team and sets the challenge for the team to accomplish, the team possesses the freedom to manage itself.  Although the team needs to be responsive to demands from higher up, the team is free to establish its own goals, time and approach.

Since the 1960s, leaders of organizations have increasingly embraced the potential of teams and teamwork.  They have increasing relied upon teams to increase performance.  The conventional wisdom is that teams enable organizations to do things better, faster and cheaper—and in an era when employees seek more control over their work lives, working on a team increases employee satisfaction and retention

Teams are getting a great deal of attention in the workplace today.  But are you really working on a team—or is it really a work group just called by another name?


Kevin Dincher is an organization development consultant, professional development coach and educator with 30 years of experience that includes not only OD consulting but also work in adult education,  counseling psychology and crisis management, program and operations management, and human resources.

LinkedIn: Kevin Dincher

Posted in Organization Development (OD), Teams. Tags: , , . Comments Off on Calling a Group a Team Doesn’t Make it So
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